An innovative approach in treating Alzheimer’s disease

A team from the University of Rochester Medical Center will publish the results of a study on an innovative approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease in the September issue of Nature Medicine.

A team from the University of Rochester Medical Center will publish the results of a study on an innovative approach for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease in the September issue of Nature Medicine.

It has long been understood that a protein called amyloid-beta plays a key role in Alzheimer’s disease by accumulating in the brain where it forms a toxic plaque. Amyloid-beta plaques prevent neurons from connecting with one another to carry information. Amyloid-beta is present everywhere in the body, flowing freely in the blood stream without having any negative effects, until it accumulates in the brain.

It would seem that concentrations of amyloid-beta in the blood stream are proportional to those in the brain. In theory, a substance that could decrease amyloid-beta concentrations in the blood could also decrease concentrations in the brain.

Researchers discovered that a particular protein called sLRP (soluble low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein) binds itself to amyloid-beta and neutralizes it. In healthy individuals, between 70 and 90% of blood amyloid-beta is neutralized by sLRP. Furthermore, not only do individuals suffering from Alzheimer’s have 30% less sLRP than healthy individuals do, it is also more likely to be damaged. This is the reason people who suffer from Alzheimer’s also have very high concentrations of amyloid-beta in the blood, and therefore in the brain.

Researchers developed a super-potent synthetic sLRP known as LRP-IV, hoping to be able to lower amyloid-beta concentrations in the blood. They began by testing their new creation on the blood of individuals with Alzheimer’s. The results were very positive. They went on to test LRP-IV on genetically altered mice with features of Alzheimer’s disease, notably elevated levels of amyloid-beta. They observed a decrease of 85 to 90% in amyloid-beta levels in the brain, as well as an improvement in the learning capacity and memory of the mice who had received LRP-IV.

With such encouraging results, researchers are now working on developing a form of LRP-IV that could be tested in humans. They are hoping this new product will be ready for testing within two years.

Scientists will have to conduct further tests and clinical studies to ensure LRP-IV is safe and effective for humans. But needless to say, this new glimmer of hope is welcomed by us all!

The drugs and pharmaceutical services featured on the familiprix.com website are offered by pharmacists who own the affiliated pharmacies at Familiprix. The information contained on the familiprix.com site is for informational purposes only and does not in any way replace the advice and advice of your pharmacist or any other health professional. Always consult a health professional before taking or discontinuing medication or making any other decision. Familiprix inc. and the proprietary pharmacists affiliated with Familiprix do not engage in any way by making this information available on this website.