Declining breast cancer cases and hormone replacement therapy

the results of a statistical study published in the online Journal of the National Cancer Institute, demonstrate the decrease in the number of breast cancer cases is linked to the massive decline in the use of HRT following the publication of the WHI results

In 2002, the results of a large study on women’s health entitled the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI), had led many women and physicians to abandon hormone replacement therapy (HRT) for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. In fact, researchers had prematurely stopped the WHI because they had noted that women who were taking a combination of estrogen and progestin were at greater risk for a variety of diseases, including breast cancer.

In 2003 and 2004, a substantial reduction in the number of breast cancer cases was observed in the United States. Some experts originally thought this decrease was due to an improvement in the screening process. However, the results of a statistical study published in the online Journal of the National Cancer Institute, demonstrate the decrease in the number of breast cancer cases is actually linked to the massive decline in the use of HRT following the publication of the WHI results.

Researchers from the University of California, San Francisco, analysed data obtained from 600,000 women who had undergone mammograms for breast cancer screening between 1997 and 2003. They noted there had been a 7% decrease in the use of HRT between 2000 and 2002, and a 34% decrease between 2002 and 2003, the year after the WHI was published. During this same period, the global rate for breast cancer had diminished by 5% per year, and by 13% per year for a type of breast cancer linked to estrogen. According to the author of this analysis, there is a direct link between the massive decline in the use of HRT and the decrease in breast cancer cases.

Today, experts recommend physicians and gynaecologists only prescribe HRT to women who are plagued by serious and unbearable menopausal symptoms, and to discontinue treatment as early as possible.

Not only is menopause a period of great physiological commotion for women, it is also often accompanied by unpleasant symptoms. Various treatments are currently available to help alleviate discomfort for women at grips with these symptoms. Speak with your physician or gynaecologist, as he or she can help quell your fears and recommend the treatment best suited to your particular situation. And remember, because each woman is unique, a treatment that works for one of your girlfriends may not work for you.

The drugs and pharmaceutical services featured on the familiprix.com website are offered by pharmacists who own the affiliated pharmacies at Familiprix. The information contained on the familiprix.com site is for informational purposes only and does not in any way replace the advice and advice of your pharmacist or any other health professional. Always consult a health professional before taking or discontinuing medication or making any other decision. Familiprix inc. and the proprietary pharmacists affiliated with Familiprix do not engage in any way by making this information available on this website.