Vaccination is also for adults!

Is your vaccination record up-to-date? In many industrialized countries, the incidence of certain contagious diseases is on the increase, even though we are normally protected from them thanks to vaccination. One of the reasons for this situation is that certain parents refuse to get their children vaccinated, and another is that many adults have not updated their own immunization.

Is your vaccination record up-to-date? In many industrialized countries, the incidence of certain contagious diseases is on the increase, even though we are normally protected from them thanks to vaccination. One of the reasons for this situation is that certain parents refuse to get their children vaccinated, and another is that many adults have not updated their own immunization.

Vaccines are not just for children! All adults should be immunized against diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), measles, mumps and rubella. What many people don’t realize is that the vaccines we get as children against these diseases must be updated in order to remain effective. In addition, new vaccines have been marketed in the past few years, including a chickenpox vaccine that reduces the risk of shingles in adults. Choosing which vaccines are necessary for any given individual depends on the person’s work-related risks, travel abroad, underlying illnesses, lifestyle and age.

For example, a yearly influenza shot is recommended for all adults over the age of 65, and for those under the age of 65 who have a high risk of complications, have family contacts with such individuals, are healthcare workers, or who want to be protected against the disease. Likewise, adults over the age of 65, along with younger individuals with certain risk factors, should get the pneumococcal vaccine at least once, as the bacteria it fights is often involved in pneumonia.

Individuals at risk for small wounds – such as gardeners, hunters and manual workers – should get a tetanus booster shot. Tetanus is an acute and often deadly disease caused by an extremely powerful neurotoxin produced by a bacterium found in the soil.

Vaccines against hepatitis A, hepatitis B, poliomyelitis, cholera, rabies, meningitis and certain so-called tropical diseases must be updated on a case-by-case basis, according to individual needs.

Most “basic” vaccines are covered by the Quebec medicare plan. Travel-related vaccines are not, however. Questions? Speak to your pharmacist!

The drugs and pharmaceutical services featured on the familiprix.com website are offered by pharmacists who own the affiliated pharmacies at Familiprix. The information contained on the familiprix.com site is for informational purposes only and does not in any way replace the advice and advice of your pharmacist or any other health professional. Always consult a health professional before taking or discontinuing medication or making any other decision. Familiprix inc. and the proprietary pharmacists affiliated with Familiprix do not engage in any way by making this information available on this website.