Could bottled-up anger raise the risk of a heart attack?

Is it bad for the heart to keep your emotions to yourself? Apparently it is. According to a study involving 2,755 male employees in Sweden, it seems that men who do not openly express their anger double their risk of a heart attack.

Is it bad for the heart to keep your emotions to yourself? Apparently it is. According to a study involving 2,755 male employees in Sweden, it seems that men who do not openly express their anger double their risk of a heart attack.

The participants were asked how they coped with anger at work, with both superiors and colleagues: did they usually deal with things head-on, let things pass without saying anything, walk away from conflict, develop symptoms like headaches or stomach aches, or let their anger out at home? The research team also took other factors into account, such as smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity, level of education, type of employment and freedom to make decisions. The men’s blood pressure, body mass index and cholesterol levels were measured at the beginning of the study (between 1992 and 1995), when they were 41 years of age on average.

Thanks to the information contained in Swedish national registers, the researchers were able to determine that from the start of the study to 2003, 47 of the 2755 participants suffered a heart attack or died as a result of heart disease. The team noted a strong correlation between bottled-up anger and heart disease.

More specifically, the researchers observed that the men who dealt with frustration by walking away or by letting things pass without speaking up had double the risk of having a heart attack or dying from heart disease compared to the men who dealt with conflicts head-on. On the other hand, developing headaches or stomach aches, or getting into a bad temper at home, did not increase the risk of heart disease.

We know that anger produces physiological tensions that can raise blood pressure and potentially impair the cardiovascular system. It is difficult to fully control our reaction to workplace conflict. However, this research provides added evidence to the theory that work stress could disrupt the cardiovascular system and eventually damage cardiovascular health. If your job is a source of conflict and significant stress, it may be time to stop and analyze the situation. Your heart health could very well be at stake.

The drugs and pharmaceutical services featured on the familiprix.com website are offered by pharmacists who own the affiliated pharmacies at Familiprix. The information contained on the familiprix.com site is for informational purposes only and does not in any way replace the advice and advice of your pharmacist or any other health professional. Always consult a health professional before taking or discontinuing medication or making any other decision. Familiprix inc. and the proprietary pharmacists affiliated with Familiprix do not engage in any way by making this information available on this website.